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Flemingville Bridge

   


Flemingville Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth

Bridge Documented: May 26, 2007
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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
West Creek Road Over East Branch Owego Creek
Location
Flemingville (Rural): Tioga County, New York
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1936 By Builder/Contractor: Unknown

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
164.7 Feet (50.2 Meters)
Structure Length
174 Feet (53 Meters)
Roadway Width
21.7 Feet (6.6 Meters)
Spans
1 Main Span(s)
NBI Number
3335150

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

The state of New York, like neighboring Pennsylvania, continued to rely on the metal truss bridge into the first third of the 20th Century, developing a standard plan for metal truss bridges and building them with moderate frequency. Unlike Pennsylvania, which went with the Pratt and Parker truss configurations, New York engineers instead went with the Warren and Warren Polygonal truss configurations. A number of these structures survive today in New York. They all feature riveted connections and "massive" members and have what would have been at the time a relatively wide deck width. Today in the 21st century, the continuity from the standard plan design is psychologically enhanced by the fact that nearly all of these bridges in New York are painted in the same green color. Despite the fact that they are late examples of truss bridge construction, and a relatively fair number remain, they still represent a structure type no longer built today, and are also highly attractive structures that make crossing a bridge something to notice and enjoy. They are also, if properly maintained, strong bridges that are more than capable of serving modern traffic needs safely and efficiently. For all these reasons, the maintenance and preservation of these structures makes sense for fiscal reasons, but also for the greater purpose of preserving these attractive structures, which offer a window into past forms of fabrication, construction, and engineering.

This example has grey paint instead of the usual green. Like many of the New York standard truss bridges, this one remains in excellent structural condition. They appear to have been built and maintained well. If New York continues to maintain these bridges into the 21st Century, their significance will skyrocket as states like Pennsylvania continue to demolish their similar bridges, thus raising the rarity of this general bridge type.

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Photos and Videos: Flemingville Bridge

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