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Fort Spokane Bridge

   


Fort Spokane Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth

Bridge Documented: August 21, 2014
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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
WA-25 Over Columbia River
Location
Fort Spokane: Lincoln County, Washington and Stevens County, Washington
Structure Type
Metal Cantilever 16 Panel Rivet-Connected Warren Through Truss, Fixed and Approach Spans: Concrete T-Beam, Fixed
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1941 By Builder/Contractor: C. and F. Teaming and Trucking Company and Engineer/Design: Ralph W. Finke (Washington Department of Highways)

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
432 Feet (131.7 Meters)
Structure Length
958 Feet (292 Meters)
Roadway Width
24 Feet (7.6 Meters)
Spans
3 Main Span(s) and 5 Approach Span(s)
NBI Number
0002658A0000000

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

View Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) Documentation For This Bridge

HAER Data Pages, PDF

HAER Documentation, Washington Cantilever Bridges - Data Pages - Drawings

View Historic Structure Reports For This Bridge

Washington State has a number of surviving cantilever truss bridges, and many of them were designed with distinctive truss shape that is dissimilar to those typically found in other states, where the "tower" is essentially flipped upside down and placed under the deck at the piers. The Fort Spokane is not one of those bridges, and instead follows the more traditional cantilever truss form found in the United States, where there are distinctive "towers" where the trusses above the roadway rise to a point over the pier points. Despite this difference in overall appearance, many of the details of the bridge are similar to other cantilever truss bridges designed by Washington Department of Highways. This includes the use of attractive arched sway bracing beams above the roadway, a feature found on many truss bridges in the state, both simple span and cantilevered. Another feature typical of Washington State's cantilever truss bridges is the lack of v-lacing or lattice in the built-up beams of the bridge. This is partly due to the fact that many bridges of this type in the state were built toward the middle of the 20th Century when v-lacing and lattice gradually became less and less common... however it is still somewhat unusual to not find lattice or lacing in at least the bracing of bridges from this period, making the lack of these elements a distinctive feature of this and other truss bridges in the state from this period. The use of concrete t-beam approach spans on this bridge is another feature shared with other Washington State cantilever truss bridges.

The suspended span is concealed in a visually attractive manner, the top chord of the cantilever arms and the suspended span all combine to form the appearance of a single unbroken curve. Thus, the suspended span does not have a horizontal top chord, and instead has one that extends and slopes slightly downward from each end post to the center of the span.

This bridge is located in a scenic setting near historic Fort Spokane. It retains excellent historic integrity making it a good example of its type.

 

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Photos and Videos: Fort Spokane Bridge

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CarCam: Eastbound Crossing
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