Historic Bridges Encyclopedia

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Iron and Steel Brands

Below is a listing of all unique iron and steel brands identified by HistoricBridges.org on bridges documented by HistoricBridges.org, which means bridges in the United States and Canada. The listings are followed by a series of photos showing example brands. Brands are listed in alphabetical order by brand text. The intent of this page is to aid in identifying unknown brands as well as providing a gallery of photos showing the different fonts and designs used by different companies, or even the same company over a period of time. When known, the approximate dates of the iron/steel on which the brand appears is shown in the caption line. The date is derived from the date of the bridge it is a part of. It should be noted that in some cases, bridge builders stockpiled iron/steel ahead of time and so the actual date at which the structural element was rolled may be a few years before the given bridge construction date.

The brand is applied to the iron/steel member on its last run through the rolling mill. It is cut into one of a pair of rolls, usually once on the roll. As a result, the brand appears at a spacing on the iron/steel that depends on the roll size.

Brands that are European in origin are noted specifically since historically only Canada made use of imported steel. The United States historically only used domestically manufactured steel.

Credit is due to the following photographers for these photos, which are all Copyrighted with All Rights Reserved: Nathan Holth, Rick McOmber, Luke Gordon, Marc Scotti, Jim Stewart, Dave Michaels, and Brandon Collett.

Last Updated: December 27, 2014. This is a work in progress, and some errors may be present. 

A H A V

Usually found in Canada. Little is known about this rare brand. It appears to be European in origin. May refer to Aachener Hutten Actien Verein of Aachen, Germany.

1896. An 1891 date appears on the brand. If it refers to the date it was rolled, it is several years older than the bridge it is a part of.

1907.

Algoma

This is the most common steel brand of Canadian origin. It is normally only found in Canada, although examples have been found in Michigan as well. Brands sometimes read simply "Algoma" or they may say "Algoma Canada." "Algoma" is stylized with a line connecting the bottom of the two "A's." Company history.

1930. Reads "Algoma Canada."

1934. Reads "Algoma Steel."

1937. Reads just "Algoma."

1946. Reads "Algoma Canada."

1953.

Unknown dates.

 AMS

"AMS" refers to Arcelor Mittal Steel and is an indication you are looking at a modern steel beam.

ARM

Little known about this brand.

Found on a bridge in Iowa.

Atkins Bros. P. R. Mills

Stands for Atkins Brothers Pottsville Rolling Mills. History of Atkins Brothers Here. (See also Pottsville, separate entry on this page).

1886.

Belge Providence

Little known about this brand. It has been found in Canada and likely is from Europe.

1885.

Bethlehem

Info about this large company.

Found on a 1902 bridge, but may not be original. Unusual example on i-beam.

1905. Has a "B" at the end.

1905.

ca. 1915. 

1920.

1923.

1930s.

1941.

 

Unknown date.

Bethlehem USA - L

Many Bethlehem brands have an "L" at the end. These appear to be only on brands from the 1940s onward. May refer to steel rolled at the Lackawanna mills after Bethlehem Steel took over their operation, similar to BSCO Lackawanna brands which were mostly to date found on 1920s steel.

1940s.

1950s.

1963.

BP

Little is known about this company.

Found on a bridge in British Columbia.

British I Steel

Appears to be a generic icon used on British steel. For example, found as part of Lilleshall brands, listed separately on this page. More research is needed, but this logo may indicate a company that was part of the nationalization of steel companies in Britain. See this article.

BSCO Cambria

These brands refer to steel rolled at the Cambria mills after Bethlehem Steel took over their operation.

1920s

1930s.

BSCO Lackawanna

These brands refer to steel rolled at the Lackawanna mills after Bethlehem Steel took over their operation in 1922.

1926.

1928.

Unknown date.

Burbach

This steel mill has been found on bridges in Canada. Sometimes has additional text. This mill was located in what is today Germany.

Unknown date.

1885.

Reads "Burbach 18 NP 

Reads "Burbach 381"

Byers

Brand for a pipe railing.

1910.

Cambria

 Became part of Bethlehem Steel along with Lackawanna by the early 1920s. More info.

1893. Unusual brand occurrence on an eyebar.

1890s.

1900-1910.

1910-1920

1955

Unknown dates.

Canada

This brand appears to be found on newer steel only. Most have a line going through the word like these examples.

These examples don't have lines going through.

Cargo Fleet England

Cargo Fleet Iron Co, Cargo Fleet Ironworks, Middlesborough. Formed 1879 and ran through 1953 before being bought out, although the brand was reportedly retained.

1911.

1934.

Carnegie

One of the most common brands. Like many companies, this one was turned into United States Steel at the start of the 20th Century, but United States Steel continued to roll steel with the old mill names for decades. More info.

1870s.

1880s. Brands from this period have a simple, bold font with no stylized details.

1886. This unusual brand included the date and a different font that was unlike the font usually used during this decade. The font with the stylized "N" was used extensively in later years.

1890s. In this decade, a combination of the older, simple font is found, as well as the newer font with the stylized "N."

1901.

1910s.

1910s. Some of the logos from this period introduced a different feature of having three little decorative dashes at each end of the text. Three of the four above brands show this.

1920s. A new feature found in this decade was the addition of "USA" to the brand. Starting in this period, some of the brands have a miniature underlined "H" after the "E" likely indicating that steel was rolled at the famous Homestead mill.

1930s.

1940s.

Unknown dates. These brands appear on plate, which is uncommon, but something that can occasionally be found on Carnegie steel. That said, when plate does have a brand on it, Carnegie is one of the most common to be found.

Unknown dates.

CMC

Appears to refer to CMC Steel, which started making steel in 1947 and remains today.

Found on a 1937 bridge, so this may be a modern steel example.

Coats

British brand usually found in Canada. Coats Iron and Steel Company of Coatsbridge, Scotland.

1889.

Colorado

1933.

1940.

Consett

British brand usually found in Canada. Read more about Consett in this article and in this article.

1896.

1907.

1911.

C. R. M. Co

It is assumed that these brands all stand for the Cleveland Rolling Mill Company. Most of these are found in Ohio and adjoining states.

1890. This extremely unusual brand is composed of a pattern of dots forming an outline of the letters.

1892-1895.

Unknown dates.

CSC

This may be a modern brand referring to China Steel Corporation.

CVL USA

Found on a movable bridge's gate. Appears to be modern, may refer to Cat Van Loi Industrial Electrical Equipment Co Ltd. The logo to the left refers to Gerdau steel, which has several mills in the USA, and is likely who actually rolled the steel.

Dorman Long

British brand usually found in Canada. Information is here.

DRM Co. Ltd

Likely a British brand. Found on a 1945 Bailey truss in Canada.

Eastern

1905-1910

1911.

1912-1914.

Frodingham

British brand usually found in Canada. Frodingham Iron and Steel Co of Scunthorpe, Lincs See this article and this article.

1911.

1945. On a Bailey truss.

Gary

Although it is assumed this brand refers to Gary, Indiana, home of United States Steel Gary Works, it is an unusual brand. Presumably other label banes were more common for this enormous mill such as Illinois.

1913.

Unknown date.

Geneva

Learn more about this brand here.

1950.

GKIS Cardiff

British brand usually found in Canada. May refer to Guest Keen Iron and Steel.

Found on a 1946 Bailey.

Glasgow

British brand usually found in Canada. Glasgow Iron and Steel Co of Wishaw.

Unknown dates.

Glengarnock Steel

British brand usually found in Canada. Learn more here.

1931.

Gulf

Apparently rare. Little known about this historical company. Internet searches for this name reveal modern companies, some overseas. This was likely a mill in the United States, perhaps run by US Steel.

Hallside

British brand usually found in Canada. Refers to Hallside Steel Works, located in Scotland. More information here. and More information here.

1885.

1896.

Illinois

Illinois Steel Company, which became part of United States Steel in 1904. Info here. See additional Illinois entries for brands with suffixes.

1910. This unusual variation has a "2" at the end.

1912. Has a "2" after the name.

1913.

1933. This unusual brand has the word "Steel" under "US" and it may therefore be one of the first appearances of the US Steel company name on steel (see additional USS entries).

1940. This one includes the US Steel name on it.

Unknown date.

Illinois - G

Some Illinois brands include the letter "G" in the brand. These initials often refer to the steel mill at which the item was rolled. Here, it is assumed that the "G" refers to the Gary, Indiana works. "USA" is often included in these Illinois brands as well. At this time, Illinois Steel was a subsidiary of United States Steel.

1915.

ca. 1920.

1926.

1929

1930s.

Illinois - S

Many Illinois brands include the letter "S" in the brand. These initials often refer to the steel mill at which the item was rolled. Here, it is assumed that the "S" refers to the South Chicago works. "USA" is often included in these Illinois brands as well. At this time, Illinois Steel was a subsidiary of United States Steel.

1910s.

1920s.

1930s.

 

1944.

Unknown date.

 

 

 

Inland

Some Inland brands have a simple font. Many others have an unusual, logo with a narrow font and the text in a diamond shape and a stylized "L" that extends under the "A". These brands are usually quite small in size, and often are hard to read. More info here.

1899.

1902.

1906.

1909.

1913.

1920. Simple font.

1920s. Diamond shaped logo. The fourth photo above is of one on plate. Brands on plate tend to be uncommon.

ca. 1925.

1930s. Simple font.

1930s. Diamond shaped logo.

Unknown exact date, but a late example.

Unknown date.

 

I S Co. - M

This may refer to Illinois Steel Company, with the M referring to a Milwaukee mill.

I & S  Co.

Little is known about this brand found on a bridge in Kansas.

Jarrow

Brand found on Canadian Bridge likely referring to a British company in the city of Jarrow.

1911.

J & L S. Co.

This brand refers to Jones and Laughlin steel company. It is not known why a small number of their steel products used the abbreviation instead of the full name. Based on the dated examples found by HistoricBridges.org it appears to have been used for a period of years around 1909 and 1911.

1909.

1910.

1911.

Unknown dates.

Jones and Laughlins.

Prior to 1902, Jones and Laughlin Steel had an "s" in their name. See this article. This fact can help date the steel and iron in bridges with the Jones and Laughlins brand. Info here.

1888.

1890s.

1901-1904

Unknown date.

Jones and Laughlin.

After 1902, Jones and Laughlins dropped the "s" from "Laughlins" and became Jones and Laughlin as seen in this article. Info here.

1909.

1910s.

1920s.

1930s.

Kaiser Steel USA

1936.

Lackawanna

Based out of Buffalo, New York.  Became part of Bethlehem Steel along with Cambria by the early 1920s. Info here.

1905-1910.

1910s.

1920s.

Unknown date.

Lanarkshire Steel Co. Ltd. Scotland

British brand usually found in Canada. Information here.

Unknown date.

Lilleshall

British brand usually found in Canada. Includes a "British-I-Steel" logo. See this article and this article.

1940.

Found on a Bailey truss.

L. S. Corp. Ltd.

Presumed British brand found in Canada. This may refer to Lancashire Steel Corporation of Warrington and Irlam

Found on a Bailey truss.

Measurements

1923. 10". Although marking the dimensions of rolled beams might seem sensible, it was rarely done with American steel. This is a rare example. No company name was found, but this example was found on a California bridge.

Minnesota

National

Found on a pipe railing.

1937.

 

NSW USA

Oliver

This brand appears to refer to a mill in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. To date it has only been found on angle steel.

1888.

1891.

Unknown date.

Unknown date.

P. R. M. Co Paterson, N. J.

These early brands of the Passaic Rolling Mill Company have only the initials of the company.

1887.

Unknown.

Passaic Rolling Mill Company

All but the earliest brands appear to simply read "Passaic"

1890.

1901-1904.

P.C.S. Co.

Presumably stands for Pacific Coast Steel Company.

1929

1931

Pencoyd

Pencoyd Iron Works. Info here.

1914.

1917.

1928.

 

1930s.

Unknown dates.

Phoenix

This company rolled typical structural iron and steel elements, as well as the famous patented Phoenix column. Brands on Phoenix columns are specifically noted in the photos below. Many of the company's pre-1900 brands also included "Philada PA" for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This tended to be excluded from post-1900 brands.

1873.

1878. Phoenix Column brand.

1878. Patent brand on Phoenix column.

Phoenix Column brand.

1884. Patent brand on Phoenix column.

1886.

1889.

1890.

1895.

1896.

1897. Phoenix Column brand.

1897.  Patent brand on Phoenix column.

1897. Overview of Phoenix column showing the patent and company name brands.

1901-1902.

1914.

1927.

1936.

Unknown dates on Phoenix columns. Assumed to be pre-1900.

Unknown dates, but these appear to be earlier examples.

Unknown date, but appears to be a mid-range (not early, not late) example.

Unknown date, but appears to be a later example.

Pottsville Rolling Mills

See also Atkins Brothers entry on this page, as these two Pennsylvania companies are related.

Simply reads Pottsville.

P S Co.

This brand refers to the Pennsylvania Steel Company of Steelton, Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Steel Company became part of Bethlehem Steel in 1916.

Republic

Info in this article.

1937.

Scullin

May refer to Scullin Steel Company of St. Louis, which previously was known as Scullin Gallagher Iron and Steel Company.

1923.

1930.

1931.

1962. 

Sheffield-SL

British brand usually found in Canada. Sheffield Steel Products.

1939.

Shelton

British brand usually found in Canada. Info here and more here.

Unknown date.

Shire Steel Co. Scotland

British brand usually found in Canada.

1911.

Skinningrove England

British brand usually found in Canada. More info here.

1912.

1934.

Tennessee

1935.

1936.

1950s.

Unknown date.

Trenton

This refers to the Trenton Works of New Jersey Steel and Iron Company.

1878.

1879.

Unknown date. Assumed to be from no later than the 1880s.

Union Iron Company

This brand refers to the company from Buffalo, New York. The city and state usually appears as part of the brand.

1875.

1883.

Unknown date.

Union Iron Mills

This brand refers to the mill in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the city and state are included as part of the brand.

1871.

USS

USS refers to United States Steel. For many decades after its creation, United States Steel brands were not used on steel, and instead the names of the absorbed companies were used (Carnegie, for example). However sometime around the 1950s (ca. 1952-1953), this practice appears to have ended, and steel was rolled with the USS name and no other fully spelled out names. (See separate entry for the transitional brand USS Carnegie). Some of these brands have letters at the end which may refer to the mill (H for Homestead, S for South Chicago, C for Carnegie, etc)

1954. This brand also includes a letter "H" as part of the brand.

1954. This brand also includes a letter "S" as part of the brand.

1957-1960. These brands also include a letter "S" as part of the brand.

1964. No additional letters on this brand.

Unknown date. This brand also includes a letter "C" as part of the brand.

ca. 1950s. This brand also includes a letter "C" as part of the brand.

Unknown date. This brand also includes a letter "H" as part of the brand.

ca. 1950s. This brand also includes a letter "H" as part of the brand.

USS Carnegie

Rare brand, apparently representative of a period where United States Steel was transitioning the use of the old company names out to replace them with USS brands.

1951.

1952.

Wadsworth Buffalo NY

The Union Iron Company apparently operated under this name for a few years around 1870.

Weirton

Info about this company.

1935.

1936.

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