Frogs of Michigan

About This Collection

Like historic bridges, frogs are another thing that are disappearing forever. Frogs are one of the most environmentally sensitive animals on the planet, in part due to their intimate relationship with the waters they spend time breeding in, and also as eggs and tadpoles. If the waters get even slightly contaminated, they are in trouble. They are also sensitive to ultraviolet light from the sun, and may also be sensitive to air quality. Frog populations have declined in recent decades, and there is a lot of speculation as to why among concerned biologists. Like historic bridges, most people do not care about frogs, and so they continue to decline in populations. And also like historic bridges, once they are gone they are gone..

This gallery is the largest of all my nature photos, and has been organized into a mini website of its own, similar in design to the Bridge Browser for

Once you enter a particular species' page, you will find that there are two categories of frog photos available, each in their own gallery. The Natural Photos gallery features frogs doing what they normally do where they normally are. These photos are an excellent way to learn about frogs and what they do. The Set Up Photos gallery features frogs that I caught and set up in different poses to create cool photos, or to show something. Those pictures are more suitable for desktop backgrounds than for science lessons. So, as such, the Natural Photos gallery is more scientific, and the Set Up Photos gallery is more of a set of desktop wallpaper images. Nevertheless, some of the nicest photos I have of frogs are in the Natural Photos gallery, and are also great for desktop wallpaper. Buttons linking you to each of these galleries, if they are available, on each frog species' webpage. No frogs were harmed in the process of photographing them!

Available Frog Pages:

Click on a thumbnail or frog name to visit the page for that frog.

Common Species Name Thumbnail
Wood Frogs
Western Chorus Frogs
Green Frogs
Leopard Frogs
Spring Peeper Frogs
Grey Tree Frogs

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