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I-94 / I-69 Black River Bridge

I-94 / I-69 Black River Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth

Bridge Documented: July 11, 2003, July 6, 2007, April 23, 2010

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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
I-69 / I-94 Over Black River and Riverside Drive
Location
Port Huron: St. Clair County, Michigan: United States
Structure Type
Metal Deck Girder, Fixed and Approach Spans: Metal Stringer (Multi-Beam), Fixed
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1950 By Builder/Contractor: Fry and Cain / Walter Toebe Company and Engineer/Design: Michigan State Highway Department

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
146 Feet (44.5 Meters)
Structure Length
766 Feet (233.5 Meters)
Roadway Width
56.8 Feet (17.31 Meters)
Spans
3 Main Span(s) and 7 Approach Span(s)
NBI Number
77177111000B030

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)
View Information About HSR Ratings

Bridge Documentation

This bridge no longer exists!

Bridge Status: Demolished and replaced ca. 2011.

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

View Some Original Plan Sheets For This Bridge

Although not the most beautiful bridge in the world at the time of demolition, this bridge was a noteworthy bridge that although on I-69/I-94, actually pre-dates the Interstate Highway System, and has some technologically significant details. This bridge was built in 1950, and was originally part of M-146, a short trunkline road that was long ago decommissioned. M-146 was a short route that ran from 24th Street, to Lapeer Avenue, then to what is today M-25. When built, this bridge would have looked a lot more beautiful, because it appears to have had Michigan's signature type R4 railings like those seen on Sigler Road. These attractive railings would have complimented the modest architectural detailing on the piers and abutments of this bridge. The architectural details of the piers and abutments managed to survive on the bridge, but the R4 railings were replaced with New Jersey barriers, which greatly diminished the aesthetic value of the bridge.

Structurally, the bridge consists of three deck plate girder spans and seven steel stringer spans. The bridge was technologically significant for its uncommon cantilevered deck plate girder design which includes an 86 foot suspended span which is connected to the bridge by a pin and hanger type system. The Michigan State Highway department built a number of cantilevered deck plate girders across the state, and a number of them remain today. Not all of them have the pin and hanger detail however. The anchor arm main spans on either side of the cantilever span include a field splice connection where the built-up plate girders were attached during erection. Also, the bridge was designed so that the main spans of the bridge function at two separate parallel bridges sharing a single pier. There are two pairs of deck plate girders under the bridge, each with their own set of floorbeams. At certain locations under the bridge a tiny gap in the deck is visible demonstrating this two bridge design. Finally, adding to the complexity of this bridge was the seven approach spans which turn the bridge into a relatively long (for Michigan) bridge of 766 feet. Also, the bridge had an 18 degree skew.

 Unfortunately, this bridge ended up being sentenced to the dumpster. As a 1950 bridge that was not designed with the Interstate Highway System in mind, the bridge was very narrow and a serious bottleneck for expressway traffic, lacking an acceleration lane for the Water Street ramp, and also lacking sufficient shoulders. Structurally however, the bridge was still in decent condition. The steel superstructure appeared to be in very good condition, with the only areas of significant rust and deterioration being around expansion joints. The abutments and piers had some areas of spalling, but nothing severe that could not be corrected by rehabilitation. The deck was the only part of the bridge in extremely bad condition. One could not complain too much about the deck however, since it appeared to be the original 1950 deck, which is impressive given the massive volume of heavy truck traffic this bridge has carried as an I-69/I-94 bridge. The replacement of this bridge was part of a larger project to completely reconstruct I-69/I-94 in the immediate area, and this greater project was designed to compliment a planned expansion of the toll and customs plaza for the Blue Water Bridge.

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Photo Galleries and Videos: I-94 / I-69 Black River Bridge

 
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Structure Overview
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview photos that show the bridge as a whole and general areas of the bridge. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Structure Details
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of detail photos that document the parts, construction, and condition of the bridge. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Structure Overview
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview photos that show the bridge as a whole and general areas of the bridge. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Structure Details
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of detail photos that document the parts, construction, and condition of the bridge. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer

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Maps and Links: I-94 / I-69 Black River Bridge

This historic bridge has been demolished. This map is shown for reference purposes only.

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