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Sciotoville Railroad Bridge

Sciotoville Railroad Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth and Rick McOmber

Bridge Documented: March 3, 2007 and June 7, 2014

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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
Railroad (CSX) Over Ohio River
Location
Sciotoville and Siloam: Scioto County, Ohio and Greenup County, Kentucky: United States
Structure Type
Metal Continuous 20 Panel Rivet-Connected Modified Warren (Subdivided) Through Truss, Fixed and Approach Spans: Metal 6 Panel Rivet-Connected Warren Deck Truss, Fixed
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1916 By Builder/Contractor: McClintic-Marshall Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Engineer/Design: Gustav Lindenthal and David Steinman

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
775 Feet (236.22 Meters)
Structure Length
3463 Feet (1055.52 Meters)
Roadway Width
Not Available
Spans
2 Main Span(s)
NBI Number
Not Applicable

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

View Historical Articles Discussing The Construction of this Bridge

View Detailed Discussion of Bridge By Gustav Lindenthal Digitized By Internet Archive

 Alternate Version of Discussion of Bridge By Gustav Lindenthal Digitized By Google

View A Historical McClintic Marshall Company Booklet With Numerous Bridge Construction Photos

This bridge held a record for a number of years after its completion for longest continuous truss bridge. It also has apparently held some sort of record for amount of weight it can hold, accounting for its massive members. Gustav Lindenthal, a noted engineer who designed such bridges as the Hell Gate Bridge in New York, was the engineer for this bridge as well. This bridge was also an early project that engineer David Steinman was involved in. Steinman later became a renowned engineer as well. An important bridge company, the McClintic-Marshall Company was the contractor for the bridge. McClintic-Marshall built such bridges as the Ambassador Bridge.

The erection method of this bridge was of interest because one side of the main span was built with falsework to keep it in balance, until the other half could be built out using the cantilever method, which brought the bridge into balance. The bridge had to be designed with parts that anticipated bending under dead and live loads. As a result, during construction before the full load of the bridge was being applied to the structural parts, some connections required special jacking to pull them into alignment to allow for rivets to be driven. This process can be seen in progress in  the photo to the left. Another construction challenge was icy flooding, which forced the acceleration of construction efforts due to concerns that the floods might damage the falsework.

The Sciotoville Railroad Bridge remains today an enormous feat of engineering, and it contains some of the most massive members and chords ever seen in a truss bridge. The bridge sits on concrete piers, and an extensive approach system is present for the bridge, including a deck truss span and numerous plate girder spans.

The Little Scioto River Railroad Bridge is nearby. An otherwise normal through truss span, it is dwarfed by the Sciotoville Railroad Bridge.

Above: Stress diagram for bridge, digitized by Internet Archive from Transactions of American Society of Civil Engineers. Click for full-size diagram.

Main Bridge Plaque

THE CHESAPEAKE & OHIO NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY

OHIO RIVER BRIDGE

TWO SPAN CONTINUOUS BRIDGE 1550 FEET LONG

BUILT 1917

FRANK TRUMPBULL.   CHAIRMAN BOARD OF DIRECTORS

GEO. W. STEVENS.   PRESIDENT

M. J. CAPLES.   VICE PRESIDENT

GUSTAV LINDENTHAL.
CONSULTING ENGINEER & DESIGNER OF BRIDGE

MCCLINTIC MARSHALL CO
FABRICATORS AND ERECTORS OF STEELWORK

Interpretive Plaque

SCIOTOVILLE BRIDGE
1917

Designed and built by two famous American Civil Engineers

GUSTAV LINDENTHAL, D. Sc. (1850-1935)
The Consulting Engineer

DAVID BARNARD STEINMAN, D Sc. (1887-1960)
The Designer and Stress Analyst

A double track railroad bridge of twin spans each 775 feet long, it remained until 1935 the longest continuous truss bridge in the world and stands today as the prototype for continuous structures.
Its construction marked a major advance in the art of bridge engineering and was a pioneer achievement in continuous truss analysis. In beauty of design, size, and erection techniques, it stands as a landmark in man's mastery of his environment.

The Ohio Historical Society

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Photo Galleries and Videos: Sciotoville Railroad Bridge

 
View Photo Gallery
2007 Bridge Photo-Documentation
A collection of overview and detail photos. This photo gallery contains a combination of Original Size photos and Mobile Optimized photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
2014 Bridge Photo-Documentation
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
2014 Bridge Photo-Documentation
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer

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