HistoricBridges.org Menu: HistoricBridges.org Menu:


We Recommend:
Bach Steel - Experts at historic truss bridge restoration.

HistoricBridges.org: Bridge Browser

CR-220 Southwest Bridge

Decatur County Bridge 114

CR-220 Southwest Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth and Rick McOmber

Bridge Documented: September 22, 2012

View Photos
and Videos
View Maps
and Links

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
CR-220 Southwest Over Muddy Fork of Sand Creek
Location
Rural: Decatur County, Indiana: United States
Structure Type
Stone Segmental Deck Arch, Fixed
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
By Builder/Contractor: Unknown
Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
20.0 Feet (6.1 Meters)
Structure Length
71.0 Feet (21.6 Meters)
Roadway Width
17.4 Feet (5.3 Meters)
Spans
3 Main Span(s)
Inventory Number
1600092

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)
View Information About HSR Ratings

Bridge Documentation

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

Although this bridge has four spans, the low rise of the arches and the shortness of these spans make this a small, low-lying bridge. The bridge's stone spandrel walls appear to retain historic integrity, but the arch ring has been altered by the addition of concrete and later a corrugated steel lining as well. 

Information and Findings From DHPA Historic Bridge Survey

Statement of Significance

Stone arches were not typically designed with segmental rings. Few of Decatur County's segmental stone arches are multispan and fewer yet have so little rise.

Architectural Description

Local craftsmen built most of Indiana's stone arches from regional materials just before or in the first fifteen years of the twentieth century. Most stonemasons preferred full-centered or semicircular arches in which the line of pressure passes through the center of each stone in the arch ring until carried vertically into the substructure. In some cases, though, masons erected segmental arches in which the intrados is less than half a circle. To function successfully, segmental arches require the substructure to accommodate some horizontal as well as some vertical pressure.

Most of the state's stone arches span streams in south-central counties. Decatur County built and retains the largest number of which less than a third are segmental. By World War I, the growing popularity of concrete, which engineers could readily adjust to the special needs of each specific bridge site, quietly ended stone arch construction in the region.

This limestone, three-span structure is 80' long and carries a 17'6" asphalt roadway between stone walls. The arch rings are segmental, and their stones are roughly-cut and mortared. The intrados of the outer spans have been reinforced with concrete. Springing from near the water level, the arches rise about 5' over outer spans of 20' and a central one of 19'. The bridge has stone footings, abutments, and wingwalls.

Other Information

In March 1872, the Decatur board appropriated $500 as a contribution to the Sand Creek Turnpike Company to aid in "constructing a bridge across Sand Creek on their road." The appropriation could have applied to #114, #118, or #190. It is unclear whether local citizens in the early twentieth century considered #114 or #117 as the "Harris City Bridge." In any case, J. M. Mathews received $30 for repairing the bridge's wingwalls of the bridge near Harris City in June 1908. In response to damages inflicted by the big 1913 flood, the commissioners accepted the plans and specifications which "J. A. Stagg, Engineer," submitted for "reconstruction of a wall" and fill of the "Harris city bridge." McQueen and Watkins secured a $267 contract for the repair in May, and the county paid them in December. The arch rings are low and quite segmental. They are also placed under considerable fill.

The intrados of the stone rings were concrete-encased in the late 1970s, and corrugated metal-plate liners inserted in 1986. The up-stream piers now carry concrete cut-waters.

Bridge Considered Historic By Survey: Yes

Divider

Photo Galleries and Videos: CR-220 Southwest Bridge

 

View Photo Gallery

Bridge Photo-Documentation

Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer.
Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer

Divider

View Photo Gallery

Bridge Photo-Documentation

Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer.
Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer

Divider

Maps and Links: CR-220 Southwest Bridge

Coordinates (Latitude, Longitude):

Search For Additional Bridge Listings:

Bridgehunter.com: View listed bridges within 0.5 miles (0.8 kilometers) of this bridge.

Bridgehunter.com: View listed bridges within 10 miles (16 kilometers) of this bridge.

HistoricBridges.org Bridge Browser: View listed bridges within 0.5 miles (0.8 kilometers) of this bridge.

HistoricBridges.org Bridge Browser: View listed bridges within 10 miles (16 kilometers) of this bridge.

2021 National Bridge Inventory: View listed bridges within 0.5 miles (0.8 kilometers) of this bridge.

Additional Maps:

Google Maps

Google Streetview (If Available)

Bing Maps

OpenStreetMap

GeoHack (Additional Links and Coordinates)

Apple Maps (Via DuckDuckGo Search)

Apple Maps (Apple devices only)

MapQuest

HERE We Go Maps

ACME Mapper

Waze Map

Android: Open Location In Your Map or GPS App

Flickr Gallery (Find Nearby Photos)

Wikimedia Commons (Find Nearby Photos)

Directions Via Sygic For Android

Directions Via Sygic For iOS and Android Dolphin Browser

USGS National Map (United States Only)

Historical USGS Topo Maps (United States Only)

Historic Aerials (United States Only)

CalTopo Maps (United States Only)


Divider
 
Home Top

Divider

About - Contact

© Copyright 2003-2023, HistoricBridges.org. All Rights Reserved. Disclaimer: HistoricBridges.org is a volunteer group of private citizens. HistoricBridges.org is NOT a government agency, does not represent or work with any governmental agencies, nor is it in any way associated with any government agency or any non-profit organization. While we strive for accuracy in our factual content, HistoricBridges.org offers no guarantee of accuracy. Information is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied. Information could include technical inaccuracies or errors of omission. Opinions and commentary are the opinions of the respective HistoricBridges.org member who made them and do not necessarily represent the views of anyone else, including any outside photographers whose images may appear on the page in which the commentary appears. HistoricBridges.org does not bear any responsibility for any consequences resulting from the use of this or any other HistoricBridges.org information. Owners and users of bridges have the responsibility of correctly following all applicable laws, rules, and regulations, regardless of any HistoricBridges.org information.

Admin Login

Divider