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Bonny Eagle Bridge

Bonny Eagle Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth

Bridge Documented: June 16, 2012

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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
ME-35 (Bonny Eagle Road) Over Saco River
Location
Hollis: York County, Maine and Cumberland County, Maine: United States
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1939 By Builder/Contractor: American Bridge Company of New York, New York

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
155 Feet (47.24 Meters)
Structure Length
160 Feet (48.77 Meters)
Roadway Width
22 Feet (6.71 Meters)
Spans
1 Main Span(s)
NBI Number
2190

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

This bridge no longer exists!

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

This historic bridge is being replaced and will be demolished by MaineDOT as part of the project!

This bridge is an excellent example of a truss bridge in Maine built to a state standard plan. It displays the typical details of a standard truss from this period in Maine including use of a Warren truss, and the inclusion of a horizontal, longitudinal beam that runs through the middle of much of the truss web. The truss shows no major alterations and as such has good historic integrity.

The bridge has some areas that rehabilitation would be beneficial, such as addressing section loss that was arrested by application of paint, but not repaired, as well as addressing a deteriorated deck. However, overall the bridge, particularly the superstructure and substructure, are in overall decent condition. The condition of the bridge is such that it would likely be far less expensive to rehabilitate the bridge rather than replace it. That being the case, how does MaineDOT address a bridge with a deteriorated deck and minor super and sub structure repair needs? With a costly demolition and replacement project that will destroy this beautiful historic bridge and replace it with a mundane structure of extremely ugly appearance. A deteriorated deck does not mean the entire bridge should be replaced. It means that the bridge's deck needs to be replaced! It is bad enough that the state is wasting money replacing a bridge that could be economically rehabilitated, thus saving both money and history. However, the replacement bridge as outlined in the replacement bridge plans is located on a new alignment immediately south of the historic bridge. A brief glance at the bridge plans clearly shows that the historic bridge is not in the way of its replacement. Therefore, it would be feasible to complete the new bridge, while leaving the historic bridge standing, either closed off to all traffic as a historic exhibit to be viewed only, or to leave the bridge open to non-motorized traffic. In other words, even with the replacement bridge project, the demolition of  the historic bridge is both pointless and a waste of taxpayer dollars. It would cost essentially nothing to leave the bridge standing. The bridge is strong enough to handle vehicular traffic at this time, therefore even without repair, it seems likely that the bridge would stand for perhaps decades without traffic on it. The Bonny Eagle Bridge is an example of something that occurs with unfortunate frequency; an example of how both tax dollars and history could have been saved but were not.

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Photo Galleries and Videos: Bonny Eagle Bridge

 
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Bridge Photo-Documentation
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
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Bridge Photo-Documentation
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
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Westbound Crossing
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.
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Eastbound Crossing
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.

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