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Rockwood Avenue Bridge

Rockwood Avenue Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth and Rick McOmber

Bridge Documented: March 3, 2007

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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
Rockwood Avenue (OH-7) Over Symmes Creek
Location
Chesapeake: Lawrence County, Ohio: United States
Structure Type
Metal 9 Panel Rivet-Connected Parker Through Truss, Fixed and Approach Spans: Metal Stringer (Multi-Beam), Fixed
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1933 By Builder/Contractor: Lackawanna Bridge Company of Buffalo, New York

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
1990
Main Span Length
162 Feet (49.38 Meters)
Structure Length
348 Feet (106.07 Meters)
Roadway Width
34 Feet (10.36 Meters)
Spans
1 Main Span(s) and 3 Approach Span(s)
NBI Number
4400038

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

This bridge is a good and uncommon surviving example of a state standard truss bridge in Ohio. Utilizing i-beams for its members rather than built-up members that might include attractive v-lacing or lattice, this is a rather simple looking truss bridge, particularly for a 1933 example. Only the top chord and end post features lattice, which occurs on its underside. On the other hand, this is indeed a bridge that is unlike any modern bridge that might be built in its place, offering much more intricacy and history than a modern bridge would. Given the bridge's good condition, it is logical to continue to maintain this structure for both fiscal and aesthetic reasons.

Information and Findings From Ohio's Historic Bridge Inventory

Setting/Context

The bridge carries a 2 lane road and sidewalks over a stream in an area dominated by a mix of early- to late-20th century residential and commercial development in Chesapeake.

Physical Description

The 4 span, 348'-long bridge has a 162'-long Parker thru truss main span flanked by steel stringer approach spans. The truss has riveted connections, built-up chords, and rolled section diagonals and verticals. The cantilevered sidewalks have tubular railings with metal panels.

Summary of Significance

The 4 -span, Parker thru truss bridge was built in 1933 by the state highway department. It is a late example of what was by 1933 a very common bridge type and design. The bridge is traditionally composed and exhibits no innovative or distinctive details. Because it is a common solution to a long-span crossing, neither the bridge nor its contexts are historically or technologically significant. It is representative of a bridge type and design as well as methods of fabrication that had been used for span lengths greater than 100' since the last quarter of the 19th century. Other state highway department bridges of the 1920s to 1940s better represent the significance of the technology and standardized approach to its application in the development of the state highway system.

Camelback and Parker trusses are members of the Pratt-family of trusses with sloped top chords Technologically, Camelback and Parker trusses differ only in the number of top chord slopes (Camelbacks have exactly five slopes, and Parkers have more than five slopes.) The sloped-chord trusses provide the greatest depth at midspan where it is needed to accommodate the stresses, meaning that less material is needed in their construction as compared to a parallel chord truss of similar span, but fabrication is made more difficult due to the varying lengths of the members. The sloped-chord trusses are often associated with longer spans where the savings in material is great enough to be worth the additional fabrication costs. The practice of sloping the top chords dates to at least the 1840s and appeared early in the development of metal trusses. As with other truss designs, pin connections were used from the 1870s to 1900s, and mostly phased out during the 1910s. Rivet connections were being used by the early 1900s and were prevalent from the 1910s to 1940s. Standardized rivet-connected Camelback and Parker designs were used by many state highway departments, including the Ohio State Highway Department. There are 23 trusses (8 Camelback, 15 Parker) in the Ohio inventory (Phase 1A, 2008).

Bridge Considered Historic By Survey: No

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