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Burnt Mill Road Bridge

Burnt Mill Road Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth and Rick McOmber

Bridge Documented: July 15, 2011

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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
Burnt Mill Road Over Conodoguinet Creek
Location
Rural: Franklin County, Pennsylvania: United States
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1885 By Builder/Contractor: Pittsburgh Bridge Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
105 Feet (32 Meters)
Structure Length
109 Feet (33.22 Meters)
Roadway Width
15.4 Feet (4.69 Meters)
Spans
1 Main Span(s)
NBI Number
28720706423066

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

This bridge is a very early surviving example of a bridge built by the Pittsburgh Bridge Company, a builder that was prolific in the region. This early example has some unusual details not found in the later bridges the company built. The bottom chord has a fishbelly design where the eyebar in the end panels has a slope to it. The bridge also has an extremely unusual detail in the top chord connections. There is a standard pin inside the top chord to which the diagonal members are connected. However below this pin there is a separate pin connection that appears to connect the vertical member to a gusset plate that is riveted to the top chord. This secondary pin is extremely unusual and this may be one of the only surviving bridges with such an unusual detail. Finally, the bottom chord connections do not use a u-bolt hanger system. Instead, the connections are frames into the floorbeam. This detail was sometimes found in the late pin-connected era, but is very rare in this earlier period. This practice however was standard for the Pittsburgh Bridge Company, and this detail is found in many of their bridges.

Information and Findings From Pennsylvania's Historic Bridge Inventory

Discussion of Bridge

The one span, 109'-long, pin-connected, Pratt thru truss bridge was fabricated in 1885 by the Pittsburgh Bridge Company. The bridge is one of six identified truss bridges (ca. 1870-1924) in Franklin County, and the only Pratt thru truss. The bridge, composed of standard built-up sections, has no significant alterations. It is supported on stone abutments with flared wingwalls. The Pittsburgh Bridge Company, established in 1878, was a successful fabricator and marketer of bridges in the state in the last two decades of the 19th century. The company had an important Franklin County connection in Thomas M. Nelson of Chambersburg, who operated as an agent contractor for the erection of the company's bridges beginning in 1883, and served as the company president from 1896 to 1900. The bridge is historically and technologically significant in the context of late-19th-century metal truss bridges in Franklin County.

Discussion of Surrounding Area

The bridge carries a 1 lane road over a stream in forested setting in a rural area of active farms. To the north of the bridge are cultivated fields and a veterinarian center.

Bridge Considered Historic By Survey: Yes

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Photo Galleries and Videos: Burnt Mill Road Bridge

 
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Bridge Photo-Documentation
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Northbound Crossing
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.
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Southbound Crossing
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.
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Car Crossing Bridge
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.

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