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High Street Bridge

High Street Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth and Rick McOmber

Bridge Documented: May 31, 2010 and June 11, 2011

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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
High Street Over Little Juniata Creek
Location
Duncannon: Perry County, Pennsylvania: United States
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1890 By Builder/Contractor: Berlin Iron Bridge Company of East Berlin, Connecticut

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
1960
Main Span Length
79 Feet (24 Meters)
Structure Length
81 Feet (25 Meters)
Roadway Width
14.4 Feet (4.39 Meters)
Spans
1 Main Span(s)
NBI Number
50740340004001

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

View Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) Documentation For This Bridge

This bridge is the only surviving pony lenticular truss bridge in Pennsylvania. The few other lenticular truss bridges left are all through truss bridges. Nationwide, all surviving lenticular truss bridges should be considered extremely rare and historically significant. However, as the last pony truss example in Pennsylvania, this bridge enjoys even more historic significance on a state level. This particular example has been left in place for non-motorized traffic only. The bridge provides access to a park area.

Prior to an on-site visit by HistoricBridges.org, the status of this bridge was largely unknown to the historic bridge community and other historic bridge websites on the Internet. The on-site visit confirmed the status of the bridge, however weather conditions included the last half hour of daylight and a nearby strong thunderstorm which had just passed over and was still generating lightning. Elaine Deutsch visited the bridge in better conditions a year later in 2011 and took additional photos for HistoricBridges.org.

Suggested future preservation work for this bridge would be the removal of the ugly solid wood panel railings on the bridge which cover up over half of the beautiful and historically significant lenticular trusses. It is a mystery why anyone would want to cover those up. Numerous alternative railings exist that do not disrupt the view of the truss but also provide an acceptable level of safety. Repair and replication of the cast iron caps would also be worthwhile for the sake of historic and aesthetic integrity of the bridge.

Information and Findings From Pennsylvania's Historic Bridge Inventory

Discussion of Bridge

The one-span, 81'-long, 5-panel, pin-connected, metal lenticular pony truss bridge built ca. 1890 has built-up upper chord, end posts, and verticals, and eye-bar diagonals and lower chord. Built-up fishbelly floorbeams support steel stringers and a wood deck with wood railings inside of the truss lines. The bridge has been altered by the addition of extra diagonals in the second and fourth panels and plate welded to the upper chords and end posts (ca. 1960). The alterations are noteworthy but not considered significant enough to adversely affect the integrity of the rare bridge type and design. Lenticular truss bridges were a patented design of the Berlin Iron Bridge Co. of Berlin, CT. The company fabricated and erected hundreds of lenticular truss bridges throughout primarily New England and New York from the late 1870s to 1900. Pennsylvania was not a major market for Berlin Iron Bridge, but the company did erect a modest number of bridges in the state, especially in some northern tier counties. No less than five lenticular truss highway bridges from 1878 to 1900 have been identified in Pennsylvania. Surviving examples document a historically important variation in late-19th-century metal truss bridge technology.

Discussion of Surrounding Area

The bridge has been closed to vehicular traffic and has been converted to a pedestrian bridge that provides access to a linear municipal park and bikepath bordering the west bank of Little Juniata Creek in Duncannon. At the northeast end of the bridge is a mixed-use commercial and residential neighborhood of late-19th to early 20th century buildings.

Bridge Considered Historic By Survey: Yes


This bridge is tagged with the following special condition(s): Reused

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Photo Galleries and Videos: High Street Bridge

 
View Photo Gallery
2011 Bridge Photo-Documentation
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
2011 Bridge Photo-Documentation
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
2010 Bridge Photo-Documentation
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos taken during a thunderstorm. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
2010 Bridge Photo-Documentation
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos taken during a thunderstorm. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Video
Walking Across The Bridge In A Thunderstorm
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.

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Maps and Links: High Street Bridge

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Bridgehunter.com: View listed bridges within a half mile of this bridge.

Bridgehunter.com: View listed bridges within 10 miles of this bridge.

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