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Hares Hill Road Bridge

Silver Bridge

Hares Hill Road Bridge

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth and Rick McOmber

Bridge Documented: May 31, 2010

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and Videos
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Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
Hares Hill Road (PA-1045) Over French Creek
Location
Rural: Chester County, Pennsylvania: United States
Construction Date and Builder / Engineer
1869 By Builder/Contractor: Moseley Iron Bridge and Roof Company of Boston, Massachusetts

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
100 Feet (30 Meters)
Structure Length
102 Feet (31 Meters)
Roadway Width
14.1 Feet (4.3 Meters)
Spans
1 Main Span(s)
NBI Number
15104500201201

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)
View Information About HSR Ratings

Bridge Documentation

View Archived National Bridge Inventory Report - Has Additional Details and Evaluation

View Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) Documentation For This Bridge

HAER Drawings, PDF - HAER Data Pages, PDF

View The Original Patent That Covers Some Elements Of This Bridge

This bridge is one of the rarest and most unusual types and designs of bowstring truss bridges in the country, designed by bridge builder Thomas Moseley. The exact design type of this bridge is described by engineers as a form of tied arch and/or a lattice girder. However in terms of understanding the history of the bridge, interpreting the thinking that went into the design of the bridge, and observing the general appearance of the bridge, this structure has more in common with a bowstring truss bridge. Patents which display portions of this bridge's design describe the bridges as truss bridges, which shows that Thomas Moseley was thinking about the truss bridge not the arch bridge when designing his bridges. Built in 1869, the bridge is one of the earliest examples of a bowstring truss bridge, a bridge type that rapidly came and went, enjoying a brief, yet widespread popularity during the 1870s. Bowstring truss bridges are rare enough in their own right today, yet this bridge may be the last of its kind. Design significance aside, the bridge is also among the oldest metal bridges remaining in North America. As a result, its historic significance is nearly without compare among bridges in the United States.

While there is no single patent that reflects the exact design of this bridge, three patents made by Thomas Moseley are related  to Moseley's bowstring bridge work. One, dating to 1870, just after this bridge was built has the most related designs. There were some other bridge patents that Moseley filed that may have inspired the design of this bridge and the 1870 patent that displays the most similar details to the Hares Hill Road Bridge, one dates to 1866 and the other dates to 1857.

Fortunately, the future of this nationally significant bridge is good. In 2010, PennDOT chose to rehabilitate this historic bridge for continued vehicular use. The quality construction of the original bridge combined with the benefits of a rehabilitation will ensure that this historic bridge remains for many years to come. The decision to rehabilitate this bridge likely cost taxpayers less than a replacement bridge would have cost. The rehabilitation of this bridge also appears to have been well-designed and conducted in a manner respective to the historic integrity of the bridge. Some of the highlights in the scope of work included deck replacement and in-kind replacement of some of the vertical members. All metal on the bridge was cleaned and repainted in a beautiful silver color. Silver is a color that was often used on bridges in the past but is sadly not used often in more recent preservation projects. Silver is a nice choice for a truss bridge because while it doesn't look too bright, it helps the bridge stand out and be noticed. It is a particularly beautiful color for a bridge when seen in the summer time, where it contrasts with green leaves.

PennDOT commented that Resident Engineer for PennDOT: Michael Suchonic, Project Inspector: John Gallager with CMC, Inc., and Contractor: Road-Con, Inc were all involved with this project. HistoricBridges.org thanks these entities for their role in preserving this extremely important part of our nation's transportation heritage. Be sure to view the photo gallery page for this bridge, as there is a collection of photos courtesy PennDOT that show the rehabilitation of this bridge.

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Photo Galleries and Videos: Hares Hill Road Bridge

 
View Photo Gallery
Structure Overview
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview photos that show the bridge as a whole and general areas of the bridge. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Structure Details
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of detail photos that document the parts, construction, and condition of the bridge. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Bridge Rehabilitation
A collection of photos from PennDOT that show the rehabilitation of this historic bridge. This photo gallery contains a combination of Original Size photos and Mobile Optimized photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Rehabilitated Bridge
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of photos from Elaine Deutsch that show the completed rehabilitated of this historic bridge. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Structure Overview
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview photos that show the bridge as a whole and general areas of the bridge. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Structure Details
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of detail photos that document the parts, construction, and condition of the bridge. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Rehabilitated Bridge
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of photos from Elaine Deutsch that show the completed rehabilitated of this historic bridge. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Video
Driving Northeast
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.
View Video
Driving Southwest
Full Motion Video
Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.

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Maps and Links: Hares Hill Road Bridge

Coordinates (Latitude, Longitude):

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Bridgehunter.com: View listed bridges within a half mile of this bridge.

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