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Pont de l'Île-d'Orléans (Île d'Orléans Bridge)

Pont de l'Île

Pont de l'Île-d'Orléans (Île d'Orléans Bridge)

Primary Photographer(s): Nathan Holth and Susie Babcock

Bridge Documented: July 10, 2019

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and Videos
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and Links

Key Facts

Facility Carried / Feature Intersected
QC-368 Over St. Lawrence River (Fleuve Saint-Laurent) (North Channel)
Location
Quebec City (Ville de Québec) and Saint-Pierre-de-l'Île-d'Orléans: Capitale-Nationale, Québec: Canada
Structure Type
Metal Pony Truss Stiffening Wire Cable Suspension, Fixed and Approach Spans: Metal Rivet-Connected Warren Deck Truss, Fixed

Technical Facts

Rehabilitation Date
Not Available or Not Applicable
Main Span Length
1,059 Feet (323 Meters)
Structure Length
5,807 Feet (1,770 Meters)
Roadway Width
Not Available
Spans
3 Main Span(s)
NBI Number
Not Applicable

Historic Significance Rating (HSR)

Bridge Documentation

This iconic heritage landmark was the first all-Canadian built long-span suspension bridge, meaning it was designed by Canadian engineers, it was built by Canadian contractors, and it was made from Canadian materials. The bridge was an important source of employment for Canadians during the Great Depression. The bridge was designed by the firm of Monsarrat and Pratley of Montréal, Québec which was run by noted engineers Charles Nicholas Monsarrat and Philip Louis Pratley. This is the earliest of three large bridges that this company designed over several decades. The 1938 Lions Gate Bridge in Vancouver, British Columbia and the 1955 Angus L. Macdonald Bridge in Halifax, Nova Scotia are later suspension bridges built by the same firm. As originally built, all three of these bridges had similar design details including pony truss stiffening, unusual paired suspender cables, and architectural details on the towers (although the later two bridges had an arched detail on the towers over the roadway). Of these three bridges, the Pont de l'Île-d'Orléans is the only one that has not had its historic integrity severely altered by the complete demolition and replacement of the stiffening truss with a stiffening girder. Thus, as both the oldest and least altered of these three masterpiece bridges by Monsarrat and Pratley, this bridge is clearly the most historically significant surviving example. The towers of the bridge rise 70.75 meters above the concrete piers. While the Dominion Bridge Company was the main contractor for this bridge, other firms played a role as well, such as the Eastern Canada Steel and Iron Works of Montréal which was a fabricator for some of the steel on the bridge. Despite its significance, this bridge is at a high risk for demolition and replacement with an ugly cable-stayed bridge.

View Detailed Heritage Report For This Bridge

View Text Only English Translation of Detailed Heritage Report For This Bridge

View Biography of Philip Louis Pratley

Above: Shop fabrication of deck truss spans by Eastern Canada Steel and Iron Works of Montréal.

Above: Historical photo showing bridge construction.

Above: Historical photo showing bridge construction.

Above: Historical photo showing bridge construction.

Above: Historical photo showing bridge construction.

Above: Historical photo showing bridge construction.

 

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Photo Galleries and Videos: Pont de l'Île-d'Orléans (Île d'Orléans Bridge)

 
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Bridge Photo-Documentation
Original / Full Size Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery offers photos in the highest available resolution and file size in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Photo Gallery
Bridge Photo-Documentation
Mobile Optimized Photos
A collection of overview and detail photos. This gallery features data-friendly, fast-loading photos in a touch-friendly popup viewer. Alternatively, Browse Without Using Viewer
View Video
CarCam: Westbound Crossing
Full Motion Video
Note: The downloadable high quality version of this video (available on the video page) is well worth the download since it offers excellent 1080 HD detail and is vastly more impressive than the compressed streaming video. Streaming video of the bridge. Also includes a higher quality downloadable video for greater clarity or offline viewing.

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Maps and Links: Pont de l'Île-d'Orléans (Île d'Orléans Bridge)

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